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Avoiding Heat Injuries in the Workplace

construction worker sweating because of heat

Summer might be great news for school-kids, but for hardworking people on the job, heat can pose real health risks. Here's what you need to know to keep everyone safe.

Heat Risks

Although summer sun does increase heat-related injuries and health risks, it's crucial to prioritize safety throughout the year--especially since heat problems have a variety of sources. Take, for example, industries that regularly deal with high volumes of hot objects, or workplaces where strenuous physical activity is combined with high humidity. Because of this, it's not just outdoor employees who are at risk; anyone who works in or around heat must be careful, aware, and safe.

OSHA defines four categories of heat associated risk. These categories are:

OSHA and Drug Testing Safety Incentives

drug testing

The rules set forth by OSHA give us a lot of required actions that every business needs to follow. And every year, the agency has a number of possible new rules that are assessed and then either rejected or accepted as new regulations. These possible actions go from the pre-rule stage, when no ruling has been made, to the rule stage and then to the final rule stage before they are accepted as OSHA workplace safety standards. In addition, clarifications are sometimes made on existing regulations.

What Employers Should Know About OSHA's Severe Violator Enforcement Program

OSHA's Severe Violator Enforcement Program

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, known as OSHA, is in charge of enforcing safety regulations across every workplace in the country. However, it doesn't have the resources needed to monitor every single workplace. To help the process, it has created the Severe Violator Enforcement Program. This is directed toward workplaces that are more likely to have health and safety violations.

Extra Enforcement

With this program, getting on the list is not what employers want. It calls more attention to them from OSHA, and it leads to a stronger expectation of enforcement. The strictest regulations are enforced in this program, and it can mean a big headache for any workplace. And because OSHA has declared these businesses to be more likely to offend, the organization will show up for multiple follow-ups to make sure the rules are continuing to be followed.

Mock OSHA Inspections Save Lives

OSHA Inspection

One of the best ways to solve a problem is to make sure it never becomes a problem in the first place. By implementing mock OSHA inspections and catching potential safety issues before they have time to get anyone hurt, you can do just that--and potentially save lives in the process. Here's everything you need to know about this simple but important solution.

Proactive Safety

No matter what you do or where you're located, security in your industry should always be a priority. The truth, though, is that every industry has its own challenges and safety risks--which means that the best way to catch issues is to approach them proactively. Mock OSHA inspections performed by qualified safety experts can help you identify problem areas, catch potential risks, and identify solutions before life-threatening incidents occur.

Is It Time for OSHA Retraining and Certification?

OSHA Inspection

While many people agree that there are too many government regulations, few would disagree that workplace safety is essential. Training, experience, and certification are the only ways to maintain a safe workplace. OSHA training courses are designing to fill this need for a wide range of industries.

Is It Time for a Refresher Course?

OSHA training courses are rarely a one-and-done situation. Changes in regulations and workplace environments expired certifications, and accidents or near-misses can all trigger a need for retraining and recertification.

Here's a look at some OSHA courses for general industry and the construction sector, along with some everyday situations which may prompt you to sign your employees up for a refresher course.

What the Finalized OSHA Crane Operator Ruling Means for Employers and Operators

OSHA Crane Operator Ruling

Boise employers waiting for a final [OSHA ruling on crane operator certification] received good news in December of 2018. The final ruling reduces complex compliance mandates for employers without compromising the health and safety of crane operators.

Here's how the ruling evolved and how it impacts Boise construction firms.

The Original OSHA Ruling

In August of 2010, OSHA issued a revised ruling placing new restrictions on the requirements for crane operator certification. Subsequent extensions were granted to allow for public comment. Representatives from industry employers, unions, and training companies expressed concerns regarding the interpretation of the "type and capacity" language.

OSHA Compliance is a Smart Business Move

OSHA Compliance

Does your company have a workplace safety strategy in place? The benefits for your business and your employees are real and measurable, and if your Boise workplace falls into specific regulated industries, OSHA compliance may be required by law.

It's Just Common Sense

For your Boise company, OSHA compliance is a smart business move. OSHA's employee health and safety programs can help you prevent serious workplace injury and death. Non-compliance in a regulated industry can result in hefty fines, but that's never the only reason for making occupational safety a priority.

Here's a look at the benefits of investing in an OSHA approved health and safety strategy for your Boise business.

Tips on Starting a Workplace Safety Program

Tips to starting a workplace safety program

In Boise, businesses that encounter workplace hazards must abide by OSHA standards. Most business owners have a commitment to keeping employees safe and healthy even without those regulations. In many cases, having a workplace safety program is the best bet for ensuring consistency and oversight. Here are some tips to get you started if you’re in the process of beginning a new program.

Understand Hazards

A workplace safety program should take into account the specifics of your industry and business. This means initially identifying the different health and safety hazards that your employees may encounter.

There are many types of potential hazards in any given industry, but to get you started here are a few that might be relevant to your business:

Why Construction Accidents Deserve Attention

Construction Safety

If you go digging into statistics about construction accidents, the statistics are a little shocking. Some numbers point to as many as 150,000 construction accidents occurring per year, some of them fatal.

What to Know

There is a lot we can learn from construction accident statistics. For instance, did you know that 60% of construction accidents affect those who are within their first year of employment? With that in mind, construction companies can implement trainings for new hires that focus on safety and awareness.

Another key bit of information? Falls are the most common accidents, so highlighting that statistic plus adding training on fall prevention and protection can help reduce those instances.

5 Popular Safety Trends You Should Take Note Of

Safety and Health Trends

Safety for every type of employee in any workplace is gaining the attention of employers, both in large industries and in smaller local businesses. And this is a very good thing. According to the 2016 Fatal Occupational Injuries report, work-related deaths have been on the rise over the past three years. People are taking notice.

In an effort to address the rising workplace fatalities, government and private businesses are finding new and innovative ways to help maintain the safety of all employees and contractors. Below are five trends gaining popularity in the health and safety industry.

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