OSHA Boise

What to Know About OSHA Crane Operator Ruling

OSHA Crane Operator Ruling

Boise employers waiting for a final [OSHA ruling on crane operator certification] received good news in December of 2018. The final ruling reduces complex compliance mandates for employers without compromising the health and safety of crane operators.

Here's how the ruling evolved and how it impacts Boise construction firms.

The Original OSHA Ruling

In August of 2010, OSHA issued a revised ruling placing new restrictions on the requirements for crane operator certification. Subsequent extensions were granted to allow for public comment. Representatives from industry employers, unions, and training companies expressed concerns regarding the interpretation of the "type and capacity" language.

OSHA Compliance is a Smart Business Move

OSHA Compliance

Does your company have a workplace safety strategy in place? The benefits for your business and your employees are real and measurable, and if your Boise workplace falls into specific regulated industries, OSHA compliance may be required by law.

It's Just Common Sense

For your Boise company, OSHA compliance is a smart business move. OSHA's employee health and safety programs can help you prevent serious workplace injury and death. Non-compliance in a regulated industry can result in hefty fines, but that's never the only reason for making occupational safety a priority.

Here's a look at the benefits of investing in an OSHA approved health and safety strategy for your Boise business.

Tips on Starting a Workplace Safety Program

Tips to starting a workplace safety program

In Boise, businesses that encounter workplace hazards must abide by OSHA standards. Most business owners have a commitment to keeping employees safe and healthy even without those regulations. In many cases, having a workplace safety program is the best bet for ensuring consistency and oversight. Here are some tips to get you started if you’re in the process of beginning a new program.

Understand Hazards

A workplace safety program should take into account the specifics of your industry and business. This means initially identifying the different health and safety hazards that your employees may encounter.

There are many types of potential hazards in any given industry, but to get you started here are a few that might be relevant to your business:

Why Construction Accidents Deserve Attention

Construction Safety

If you go digging into statistics about construction accidents, the statistics are a little shocking. Some numbers point to as many as 150,000 construction accidents occurring per year, some of them fatal.

What to Know

There is a lot we can learn from construction accident statistics. For instance, did you know that 60% of construction accidents affect those who are within their first year of employment? With that in mind, construction companies can implement trainings for new hires that focus on safety and awareness.

Another key bit of information? Falls are the most common accidents, so highlighting that statistic plus adding training on fall prevention and protection can help reduce those instances.

Facts About OSHA and Workplace Violence

Fights in the workplace

OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Act) develops strategies for successful safety and health management systems. Their approach to workplace violence is one of prevention and zero-tolerance.

What is Considered Workplace Violence?

Workplace violence can be actual assault, verbal abuse, or threatening violence. It can occur in or outside of the workplace as well. Data shows that around 2 million Americans have been subjects of violence in the workplace. There is no way to say who will commit this crime or who their chosen victims are but it can happen any place at any time. Those with increased risk are people who handle money, work during late night or early morning hours, have contact with the public, or work in high-crime areas.

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